Category Archives: Success Stories Series

A Butt Kicking FASD Success Story! – 3rd Story – Success Stories Series – (Second Around)

Jeremy Elliott runs a martial arts studio in Ontario. His 4-year old godson William lives with FASD and has been training in martial arts at Jeremy’s studio. This has given him structure, boundaries and focus – things that are even more important to someone living with FASD. Even more importantly, it’s FUN!

This video was produced in 2012.  William added a comment to the video feed. It said simply “Hi I am William I am 10 now! and I am still doing it “. 

Thanks to Jeff Noble for sharing this boy’s success

 

Disclaimer: The views and opinions in this video are those of the producers and do not necessarily represent the views of Edmonton and Area Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder Network.

Enjoying the Smaller Things -FASD Success Stories- 2nd Story (Second Round)

Here is the story of Roni and her beautiful family.  When Roni and husband’s last born moved out they decided to foster their great niece and nephews who have FASD.  The journey hasnt been easy but they are here sharing their success!

Here is the article as retrieved from: http://fasdforever.com/feedback/success-stories/page/10/

This is myself and my amazing husband of twenty eight years.969978_531920986845470_1775463338_n

We live in Colorado USA. Left to right is Carlton-5 now 6, Johnathon-2 now 3, Josh-1 now 2, Tiffany-4 now 5.. In 2012 we became empty nesters with our youngest son moving out to start his life in the Navy and now living in Japan. Then we started a journey of foster parents to our Great Niece and Nephews as an ICPC transfer from VA to Co. We were recently given custody and we are looking forward to adoption some day. During our fourteen month journey we are discovering that the children came with two IEP’s and two IFSP’s, asthma and vision issues. Now, we have discovered that all four have FASD a few have PTSD, ADHD, LD and Mood issues. Two of the children have come from one to two hour long melt downs every other day to one time a week or every other week and thirty minutes maybe. My six year old gave me a hug and said he was glad that he gets to live with us and that he is glad I’m his Mom!!! My five year old has been working on shopping skills, such has not tearing up the store, taking everything off the shelf’s to play with and not licking shopping carts, today she chose one out of her three coping strategies on her OWN to put her hands in her pockets when she feels that she can’t stop getting in to everything she sees!!

These are children that have talked about wanting to die since the age of three and would try to run in to a street full of cars and now walk with me and do not run off!!! Thank you Jeff and everyone this website helped me to understand it’s not my fault, that I can’t fix everything, but I am trying my best to manage, to look back and see how far we have come and value that. I still catch myself stressing and worrying about their futures, but not as much. I am grateful for the small things like being able to go shopping for food and my daughter can make it through the store and feel success and my son not speaking words of hate but learning to love.

Thank you and God bless all of you!

Roni

FASD Fails to Dumpen Tisha’s Sprits

Cape Town – For the first 10 weeks of her life Tisha Lourens lay in an incubator at Mowbray Maternity Hospital with no mother to love, cuddle or feed her much-needed breast milk.

Apart from being born prematurely, the effects of Foetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) were so dreadful that her tiny body shivered from the withdrawal symptoms of alcohol.

Source: http://www.iol.co.za/news/south-africa/western-cape/fas-fails-to-dampen-tishas-spirits-2068790

Tisha Lourens, with her foster mother Vivien, was born with Foetal Alcohol Syndrome and was expected to die as a baby, but 20 years on, she now holds down a job and has thrived. Picture: Cindy Waxa. Credit: INDEPENDENT MEDIA

Her biological mother, from Brown’s Farm in Philippi, had abandoned her in hospital, and wanted nothing to do with her.

When the then emergency foster mother for the Cape Town Child Welfare, Vivien Lourens of Pinelands, received the petite baby, who weighed just over 2kg, the first thing that came to her mind was to give her a bottle to feed.

“I realised then that she could not suckle. Her reflexes were so poorly developed due to FAS that she could not drink from the bottle. In panic I phoned the hospital telling them that the baby was not feeding. A nurse that answered just said Don’t worry about it, she won’t live beyond this weekend’,” Laurence recalled.

Not only did she have FAS symptoms, but she also had a congenital hole in the heart and an underdeveloped stomach valve, which pushed food up when she ate.

But after intensive multi-disciplinary therapy, including physiotherapy anjdoccupational therapy, and many visits to specialist doctors and psychologists at Red Cross Children’s Hospital, the now 20-year-old Tisha thrived and healed without needing surgery – shocking doctors and proving sceptics wrong.

Despite the absence of services and support for FAS babies, she survived against all odds.

Lourens, who also cares for another adult foster daughter, Carrie Lourens, who suffers from FAS spectrum disorder (FASD), said that despite the high prevalence of FAS in the country, many mothers lived in ignorance and knew very little or nothing about the effects of alcohol on the brain of an unborn child.

The latest research finds the country has the highest recorded rate of FAS in the world with scientists estimating that 10 percent of the population is affected by either FAS or the spectrum of disorders related to it.

Though Lourens was meant to look after Tisha and Carrie temporarily, she says that after falling in love with “these special babies”, her family could not let them go. “Everyone in my family just fell in love with Tisha and Carrie. They are the most wonderful human beings. They changed our lives in an amazing way, and we just could not let them go.

“I cared for Carrie from the age of eight months, and Tisha from just two months, so you can imagine the bond that I formed with them,” she said.

After years of pre-primary schooling and studying at Bel Porto special needs school, Tisha and Carrie now work at the Merrypak factory in Pinelands where they package and barcode goods.

Last Friday Tisha and Carrie celebrated the 17th World Foetal Alcohol Syndrome Day – an awareness initiative that Lourens and a group of FAS activists around the world initiated in 1999.

The experience of living with a FAS-affected child has seen Lourens starting the FAS Information Centre (Fasic) where she provides information and support to people who care for FAS children.

She also wrote a book called Living With Foetal Alcohol Syndrome: Our journey with Tisha, which tells her story of dealing with the syndrome and gives tips on how to deal with FAS. Children affected by either FAS or FASD suffer from physical and behavioural problems such as learning and memory; struggling to control their emotions; communication and socialising, among other things.

Lourens said despite predictions that Tisha would fall behind her milestones and only start walking at the age of four, “she managed to beat all odds and has met most physical milestones and was walking shortly after her first birthday” thanks to rigorous early interventions.

“She still can’t read or write as her mental state has been affected by FAS quite severely, but we managed to catch up with the physical ability. She mostly works with logos and can easily identify brands she is familiar with.

“Tisha is great with computers and has learnt most things on the internet. She is great with practical stuff, she can even make looms (elastic bracelets) – thanks to the internet,” she said.

During the Cape Argus visit to her work on Wednesday, all Tisha could say was: “I love my mom, she is the only mother I know. She is very nice, and treats me well.”

Disclaimer:  The views and opinions in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of Edmonton and Area Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder Network.

School Success with FASD – Success Stories Series

Jeff Noble’s interview with Crystal who lives with FASD and currently attending university.  Watch this video to find out what is making her successful.

 

 

Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nlF_wQCnFg4

Disclaimer:  The views and opinions in this video are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of Edmonton and Area Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder Network.

Just When Things Seem Bleak…….FASD Success Stories Series (13th Story)

My friend Dan Dubovsky often says in his training sessions that people with an FASD have concrete thinking and they often have moments of great insight. I want to share two such moments that my son had when he was very young.

One day he was visiting my mother at the recreational community she spent her summers in and she was taking him for a ride on her golf cart through the beautiful wooded area. The golf cart broke down a great distance from her summer place and they had to wait in the woods for quite awhile for my stepfather to come and rescue them. After a good deal of time spent waiting, talking together, and looking at the nature surrounding them my son said, “Mom-Mom, I think God is giving us a Time-Out.”

He offered me another unique perspective one day as we were driving in the car. He asked, “Dad, is Mom-Mom going to have an Easter Egg Hunt for me again this year?” I answered, “Of course she will, it is a tradition.” My son said slyly, “I know what a tradition is.” So I took the bait and asked, “What is it?” He replied, “It’s when you do the same old thing, only it’s still fun.”

Mike

Source: http://fasdforever.com/feedback/success-stories/page/4/

Enjoying the Smaller Things- FASD Success Stories Series (11th Story)

Thanks to Jeff Noble – FASD Forever! for sharing these amazing stories.  It is through such stories that parents and caregivers get hope and a new perspective to a situation their child is going through. Keep doing what you do!


969978_531920986845470_1775463338_n

This is myself and my amazing husband of twenty-eight years.

We live in Colorado USA. Left to right is Carlton-5 now 6, Johnathon-2 now 3, Josh-1 now 2, Tiffany-4 now 5.. In 2012 we became empty nesters with our youngest son moving out to start his life in the Navy and now living in Japan. Then we started a journey of foster parents to our Great Niece and Nephews as an ICPC transfer from VA to Co. We were recently given custody and we are looking forward to adoption some day. During our fourteen-month-journey, we are discovering that the children came with two IEP’s and two IFSP’s, asthma and vision issues. Now, we have discovered that all four have FASD a few have PTSD, ADHD, LD and Mood issues. Two of the children have come from one to two-hour long meltdowns every other day to one time a week or every other week and thirty minutes maybe. My six-year-old gave me a hug and said he was glad that he gets to live with us and that he is glad I’m his Mom!!! My five-year-old has been working on shopping skills, such has not tearing up the store, taking everything off the shelf’s to play with and not licking shopping carts, today she chose one out of her three coping strategies on her OWN to put her hands in her pockets when she feels that she can’t stop getting into everything she sees!!

These are children that have talked about wanting to die since the age of three and would try to run in to a street full of cars and now walk with me and do not run off!!! Thank you Jeff and everyone this website helped me to understand it’s not my fault, that I can’t fix everything, but I am trying my best to manage, to look back and see how far we have come and value that. I still catch myself stressing and worrying about their futures, but not as much. I am grateful for the small things like being able to go shopping for food and my daughter can make it through the store and feel success and my son not speaking words of hate but learning to love.

Thank you and God bless all of you!

Roni

Found on: http://fasdforever.com/feedback/success-stories/page/10/

Try, try… and then try again! – FASD Success Stories Series (10th Story)

Thanks to Jeff Noble – FASD Forever! for sharing these amazing stories.  It is through such stories that parents and caregivers get hope and a new perspective to a situation their child is going through. Bravo!


10th success storyMy 10 year old son, Sam, who is diagnosed with an F.A.S.D., had success in a social setting.  One of his biggest challenges is participating in social settings, because his extreme anxiety prevents him from participating.

Every year we have our “Annual Cub Scout Swim Party” where we set up a water slide going down a big hill.  For the past two years when we have come to this party, Sam has sat on the side and just watched all of his peers enjoy the water slide.  His anxiety prevented him from participating.

Well, this last August when Sam attended our “Annual Cub Scout Swim Party”, we put supports in place.  First of all, we let Sam swim in his clothes! (much less invasive then a swimsuit that he’s not used to wearing).  Also, we brought Sam to the activity before anyone else arrived and let him see the water slide and let him go down the water slide all by himself without anyone watching. These supports made the difference! When others arrived and the party began, Sam actually participated!  He went down the water slide multiple times with his peers, laughing and having fun with them.  In fact, he participated the entire evening, with a smile on his face. We were so happy to see our son having FUN with his peers! :)

Mindy
Utah, USA

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