Tag Archives: prevention

Red Shoes Rock: Take Up The Challenge This Summer

30707928_997816503703468_6383703870224203776_n

Thanks to our friends at Red Shoes Rock (https://www.facebook.com/RedShoesRock/), we will be taking up their challenge this summer in sporting red shoes as we roll, step, kick, nod, wave, blink, and run to build awareness around Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) in an aim to make Edmonton and surrounding area the most FASD friendly city in Canada.

Stay tuned for more details but get your Red Shoes ready to Rock On!

youth-stylish-walking-skate-shoes-for-man-s-green-red-black-color-stretch-fabric-loafers-mens

 

 

Trauma-informed FASD Prevention and Care – Upcoming Webinar

Screen Shot 2018-04-16 at 8.34.28 AM

Service providers and FASD prevention advocates are well aware of the intersections of trauma, substance use, and mental health issues as first described by researchers like Lisa Najavits (Najavits, Weiss, & Shaw, 1997). Research from the Women and Co-occurring Disorders and Violence study substantiated what many understood intuitively – that women with substance use problems facing complex life issues are best served through multi-leveled, integrated service models that are trauma-informed, gender-specific, and holistic (Amaro, Chernoff, Brown, Arévalo, & Gatz, 2007; Brown & Melchior, 2008).

There is an upcoming opportunity to learn more about applying these approaches to FASD prevention and care in a webinar on April 18th at 9:00 am MST. The CSS Learning Series webinar as part of their FASD Learning Series will feature speakers Candice Sutterfield, Lakeland Centre for FASD, and Dr. Peter Choate, Assistant Professor of Social Work at Mount Royal University and clinical supervisor for the Alberta College of Registered Social Workers. They will address both a prevention and supports & services perspective. Sign up here: http://csslearningseries.ca/trauma-informed-fasd-prevention-and-care-registration-2/

Programs in Canada, like Breaking the Cycle and HerWay Home, currently offer integrated programs for/with pregnant and parenting women with substance use issues. Their program frameworks are trauma- and FASD-informed and they offer substance use treatment/support programming as well as needed social services and referrals at a single access point. Program evaluation findings show that relationship building is the key component benefiting women’s growth and supporting the mother-child relationship long-term. (See their evaluations here: Breaking the Cycle and HerWay Home).

In a very recent study undertaken in Ontario, findings from interviews with women participating in integrated programs, described qualities of a therapeutic relationship that helped women improve emotional regulation and executive functioning (Milligan, Usher, & Urbanoski, 2017). Therapeutic relationships that incorporate trust, care, positive regard and a non-punitive attitude can create a safe attachment from which women can apply effective problem solving in all areas of their lives.

Sign up for the webinar and see these earlier posts for more information:

The Mother-Child Study: Evaluating Treatments for Substance-Using Women, March 18, 2015

HerWay Home Program for Pregnant Women and New Mothers in Victoria, BC, February 12, 2013

REFERENCES

Amaro, H., Chernoff, M., Brown, V., Arévalo, S., & Gatz, M. (2007). Does integrated trauma-informed substance abuse treatment increase treatment retention? Journal of Community Psychology, 35(7), 845-862.

Brown, V. B., & Melchior, L. A. (2008). Women with co-occuring disorders (COD): Treatment settings and service needs. Journal of Psychoactive Drugs, SARC SUPPL 5, 365-385.

Milligan, K., Usher, A. M., & Urbanoski, K. A. (2017). Supporting pregnant and parenting women with substance-related problems by addressing emotion regulation and executive function needs. Addiction Research & Theory, 25(3), 251-261. doi:10.1080/16066359.2016.1259617

Najavits, L. M., Weiss, R. D., & Shaw, S. R. (1997). The link between substance abuse and posttraumatic stress disorder in women. A research review. The American Journal On Addictions / American Academy Of Psychiatrists In Alcoholism And Addictions, 6(4), 273-283.

f28df-1445359631870

FASD Webinar: Trauma-Informed FASD Prevention and Care, April 18, 2018

Register now for the April 18, 2018, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) Webcast

Join us for this free webcast titled: Trauma-Informed FASD Prevention and Care.

In this webinar, our presenters will discuss the issues of trauma-informed FASD prevention and care. They will provide a definition of trauma and the impact it has on health, relationships, substance abuse, FASD prevention and presentation of services.

The topic will be addressed from both a prevention and supports and services perspective.

This webinar will be of interest to front-line workers, managers, support staff, caregivers and anyone directly affected by FASD.

AGENDA:
Date: Wednesday, April 18, 2018
Time: 9:00 p.m. – 10:00 a.m. MST
Speakers: Candice Sutterfield and Dr. Peter Choate

Register Here
Format: Presenters with PowerPoint Presentation
Cost: FREE! Please share with your networks
Q&A: You can pose questions to the speakers through the live chat functionality. Remember, the live webcasts are interactive and we encourage you to participate in the question and answer portions by typing questions for speakers in the chat window, which is located below the main video panel on the webcast page.

SPEAKER BIOS
Candice is the supervisor for the mothers-to-be mentorship program, part of the Alberta Parent-Child Assistance Program, with the Lakeland Centre for FASD. As a supervisor, Candice provides guidance to the regional mentors, who build relationships with local partners through attendance at interagency meetings, annual medical advisory meetings, and regular meetings with key partners.

Dr. Peter Choate is a registered social worker and member of the clinical registry and an approved clinical supervisor for the Alberta College of Registered Social Workers. He holds a PhD in Addictions and a Master of Social Work. He is an Assistant Professor of Social Work at Mount Royal University.

Previous webcasts are available on the CSS Learning Series Website.

THE FASD LEARNING SERIES:
The FASD Learning Series helps individuals, caregivers, front-line workers and professionals learn more about FASD, and how to support persons with FASD. The educational sessions cover a broad range of topics and are accessible to all Albertans.

Alberta’s FASD 10-Year Strategic Plan outlines the government’s commitment to provide awareness and prevention of FASD, as well as assessment, diagnosis, and support for individuals with FASD and their caregivers. All services and activities are built on a foundation of stakeholder engagement.

‘Alcohol and pregnancy don’t mix’

Sourced from: http://www.thesouthernreporter.co.uk/news/health/alcohol-and-pregnancy-don-t-mix-1-3879873.
Embedded image permalinkFetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) is the name given to a group of permanent conditions that a person can develop when he or she is exposed to alcohol before they are even born. These conditions can include behavioural issues, and birth defects. As FASD is entirely preventable it is important for people to protect babies whenever possible.

By avoiding alcohol for the duration of your pregnancy, including the pre-pregnancy stage, you can ensure your baby will be born without alcohol-related brain damage.

The message being delivered by Elaine Torrance, chair of the Alcohol and Drug Partnership, is: “FASD is 100% avoidable and I am very clear that we need to increase awareness and understanding of this issue locally. Women who are pregnant or trying to conceive should avoid alcohol altogether.”

Dr Diana Leaver, NHS Borders community paediatrician, said: “Children affected by FASD often show a variety of learning difficulties and behavioural problems and may be regarded as being wilful or undisciplined, when in fact they have little control over their behaviour. These children are not being naughty; it is the damage to their brain and nervous system caused by alcohol which means they truly cannot help behaving in this way.”

NHS Borders head of midwifery, Nicky Berry, said: “Everyone can play a role in raising awareness and preventing fetal alcohol harm. Families in particular can be supportive, especially when they are made aware of the long term health benefits.”

She added: “The earlier we can provide factual information and practical guidance to prospective mothers and their partners, the better the outcome will be for their baby. Any woman who is concerned about alcohol in pregnancy should speak to their midwife”.

Source: http://www.thesouthernreporter.co.uk/news/health/alcohol-and-pregnancy-don-t-mix-1-3879873

A big Thanks to FASD Programs in Edmonton and Area – 2015 FASD Awareness Day

Thank you all for your support and effort.  Today’s event was a success because of you.  You have all been amazing.  Hopefully more people know about #FASD today than they did yesterday! Let’s do this again next year!

#FASDAwarenessDay2015 #TYTD2015 #EFANFASDyeg #PreventFASDyeg

Nunavik health centres streamline family wellness services

Some of the health care staff who work with the SIPPE program out of Tulattavik include, from left, social pediatrics nurse Pascale Larouche, family educator Stacey Ningiuruvik-Turner, hearing and otitis support worker Lucy Ekomiak, social work Sophie Gonthier and SIPPE/FASD coordinator Marie-Claude Péloquin. (PHOTO BY SARAH ROGERS)

Some of the health care staff who work with the SIPPE program out of Tulattavik include, from left, social pediatrics nurse Pascale Larouche, family educator Stacey Ningiuruvik-Turner, hearing and otitis support worker Lucy Ekomiak, social work Sophie Gonthier and SIPPE/FASD coordinator Marie-Claude Péloquin. (PHOTO BY SARAH ROGERS)

KUUJJUAQ — Stacey Ningiuruvik-Turner’s office at the Tulattavik health centre in Kuujjuaq is full of toys, but her work is far from child’s play.

Seated on a shelf are three life-size baby dolls, each in a sleeper. Their facial expressions tell of different health scenarios: the baby on the left shows the features of an infant exposed prenatally to drugs; the baby on the right shows the features of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD); the baby in the centre is considered healthy.

Ningiuruvik-Turner is a family educator with the centre’s integrated perinatal and early childhood services program, often called by its French-language acronym SIPPE.

Her job is to visit homes, schools and daycares in Nunavik’s largest community to deliver educational materials on healthy pregnancy and caring for babies and toddlers.

FASD prevention is a major part of that education, Ningiuruvik-Turner says, noting there is no diagnostic program in Nunavik.

“When people say they don’t know anything about FASD, I’m happy to tell them,” she said, motioning towards the three baby dolls. “I can give them basic information on FASD and show them how to notice things like facial features. We give them information on all the supports available in the community.”

Ningiuruvik-Turner is among the very first family education workers hired in Nunavik as the health centre rolls out its integrated services program, aimed at family wellness. Its goal: to bring together existing health care professionals and social programming from across the region in order to offer a full array of support to expecting parents and children, from birth until they enter school.

Family educator Stacey Ningiuruvik-Turner designed this logo to go on magnets and grocery bags. It reads: Let’s raise healthy and happy children, it takes a village to prevent FASD.

Family educator Stacey Ningiuruvik-Turner designed this logo to go on magnets and grocery bags. It reads: Let’s raise healthy and happy children, it takes a village to prevent FASD.

That means that, from the time a woman learns she’s pregnant, she and her spouse and family are targeted for services and support like FASD prevention, nutritious food baskets and birthing education.

“When parents come to do a pregnancy test, the education starts there,’ said Marie-Claude Péloquin, the SIPPE-FASD coordinator at Tulattavik.

This month, SIPPE staff will organize the program’s first-ever baby shower, when expecting moms can come together and celebrate their maternity. The health centre will be giving away its first batch of baby baskets — a small cradle or basket for a newborn to sleep in, filled with gifts like pyjamas, blankets, mittens and other basics.

Finland spearheaded these baby-boxes, but Péloquin said the idea was in part inspired by the sudden death of an infant in Puvirnituq last summer, who is believed to have died of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. In a region where overcrowded housing is common, it’s important for newborns to have a safe space to sleep, she said.

Once the baby arrives, families receive regular home visits, which include basic education on how to soothe a crying baby, SIDS and discipline. As children move into the daycare system, the centre’s early stimulation program workers visit to identify children with any special needs.

In the South, SIPPE is already delivered by health centres across the province but the services are generally targeted at the most vulnerable populations.

But in the North, the program’s coordinators decided that all Nunavimmiut families could be considered vulnerable, so the program is extended to everyone in the region.

Instead of health and social services delivered individually, Nunavik’s two major health centres, Tulattavik and Inuulitsivik, are working on developing a more integrated approach, explained Luce Lepage, the head of youth and family program at Tulattavik.

“For all these young families with children from age 0-5, we consider: how can we prioritize the services they need?” Lepage said. “It’s really a community approach.”

The project has been established in Kuujjuaq, in part in Kangiqsualujjuaq and will be implemented in a third community in the fall of 2015.

The project’s longer-term goal is to allow each Nunavik community to adapt and develop the program according to its own needs, Lepage said.

“That’s why is so important to support the Inuit family educators and give them the support they need to stay on,” she said.

These three baby dolls at Kuujjuaq's Tulattavik health centre each represent a different health scenario: the baby on the left shows features of an infant exposed prenatally to drugs, the baby on the right shows features of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD), while the baby in the middle is considered healthy. A family coordinator based at the health centre uses those dolls to do FASD awareness and prenatal education for young families in the Nunavik community

These three baby dolls at Kuujjuaq’s Tulattavik health centre each represent a different health scenario: the baby on the left shows features of an infant exposed prenatally to drugs, the baby on the right shows features of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD), while the baby in the middle is considered healthy. A family coordinator based at the health centre uses those dolls to do FASD awareness and prenatal education for young families in the Nunavik community

As an Inuk mom of a two-year-old boy, Ningiuruvik-Turner understands how important family support is to young families.

And she understands the challenges parents face raising their children in a region that struggles with a housing shortage, domestic violence and addiction.

“When I go into the high school to talk to teenagers about [family planning and wellness], they always have a lot of questions for me,” Ningiuruvik-Turner said.

Those questions remind her that her outreach work is effective.

“I really hope those teenagers realize they can be a part of this too,” she said. “It would be awesome to have more Inuit working on this.”

FASD: Don’t be misinformed – 1st Video Series

There are a lot of misconceptions about fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. Watch this spot to get the truth.  A series of PSAs about FASD have recently been running on TV in Alaska.

« Older Entries