Tag Archives: prevention

‘Alcohol and pregnancy don’t mix’

Sourced from: http://www.thesouthernreporter.co.uk/news/health/alcohol-and-pregnancy-don-t-mix-1-3879873.
Embedded image permalinkFetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) is the name given to a group of permanent conditions that a person can develop when he or she is exposed to alcohol before they are even born. These conditions can include behavioural issues, and birth defects. As FASD is entirely preventable it is important for people to protect babies whenever possible.

By avoiding alcohol for the duration of your pregnancy, including the pre-pregnancy stage, you can ensure your baby will be born without alcohol-related brain damage.

The message being delivered by Elaine Torrance, chair of the Alcohol and Drug Partnership, is: “FASD is 100% avoidable and I am very clear that we need to increase awareness and understanding of this issue locally. Women who are pregnant or trying to conceive should avoid alcohol altogether.”

Dr Diana Leaver, NHS Borders community paediatrician, said: “Children affected by FASD often show a variety of learning difficulties and behavioural problems and may be regarded as being wilful or undisciplined, when in fact they have little control over their behaviour. These children are not being naughty; it is the damage to their brain and nervous system caused by alcohol which means they truly cannot help behaving in this way.”

NHS Borders head of midwifery, Nicky Berry, said: “Everyone can play a role in raising awareness and preventing fetal alcohol harm. Families in particular can be supportive, especially when they are made aware of the long term health benefits.”

She added: “The earlier we can provide factual information and practical guidance to prospective mothers and their partners, the better the outcome will be for their baby. Any woman who is concerned about alcohol in pregnancy should speak to their midwife”.

Source: http://www.thesouthernreporter.co.uk/news/health/alcohol-and-pregnancy-don-t-mix-1-3879873

A big Thanks to FASD Programs in Edmonton and Area – 2015 FASD Awareness Day

Thank you all for your support and effort.  Today’s event was a success because of you.  You have all been amazing.  Hopefully more people know about #FASD today than they did yesterday! Let’s do this again next year!

#FASDAwarenessDay2015 #TYTD2015 #EFANFASDyeg #PreventFASDyeg

Nunavik health centres streamline family wellness services

Some of the health care staff who work with the SIPPE program out of Tulattavik include, from left, social pediatrics nurse Pascale Larouche, family educator Stacey Ningiuruvik-Turner, hearing and otitis support worker Lucy Ekomiak, social work Sophie Gonthier and SIPPE/FASD coordinator Marie-Claude Péloquin. (PHOTO BY SARAH ROGERS)

Some of the health care staff who work with the SIPPE program out of Tulattavik include, from left, social pediatrics nurse Pascale Larouche, family educator Stacey Ningiuruvik-Turner, hearing and otitis support worker Lucy Ekomiak, social work Sophie Gonthier and SIPPE/FASD coordinator Marie-Claude Péloquin. (PHOTO BY SARAH ROGERS)

KUUJJUAQ — Stacey Ningiuruvik-Turner’s office at the Tulattavik health centre in Kuujjuaq is full of toys, but her work is far from child’s play.

Seated on a shelf are three life-size baby dolls, each in a sleeper. Their facial expressions tell of different health scenarios: the baby on the left shows the features of an infant exposed prenatally to drugs; the baby on the right shows the features of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD); the baby in the centre is considered healthy.

Ningiuruvik-Turner is a family educator with the centre’s integrated perinatal and early childhood services program, often called by its French-language acronym SIPPE.

Her job is to visit homes, schools and daycares in Nunavik’s largest community to deliver educational materials on healthy pregnancy and caring for babies and toddlers.

FASD prevention is a major part of that education, Ningiuruvik-Turner says, noting there is no diagnostic program in Nunavik.

“When people say they don’t know anything about FASD, I’m happy to tell them,” she said, motioning towards the three baby dolls. “I can give them basic information on FASD and show them how to notice things like facial features. We give them information on all the supports available in the community.”

Ningiuruvik-Turner is among the very first family education workers hired in Nunavik as the health centre rolls out its integrated services program, aimed at family wellness. Its goal: to bring together existing health care professionals and social programming from across the region in order to offer a full array of support to expecting parents and children, from birth until they enter school.

Family educator Stacey Ningiuruvik-Turner designed this logo to go on magnets and grocery bags. It reads: Let’s raise healthy and happy children, it takes a village to prevent FASD.

Family educator Stacey Ningiuruvik-Turner designed this logo to go on magnets and grocery bags. It reads: Let’s raise healthy and happy children, it takes a village to prevent FASD.

That means that, from the time a woman learns she’s pregnant, she and her spouse and family are targeted for services and support like FASD prevention, nutritious food baskets and birthing education.

“When parents come to do a pregnancy test, the education starts there,’ said Marie-Claude Péloquin, the SIPPE-FASD coordinator at Tulattavik.

This month, SIPPE staff will organize the program’s first-ever baby shower, when expecting moms can come together and celebrate their maternity. The health centre will be giving away its first batch of baby baskets — a small cradle or basket for a newborn to sleep in, filled with gifts like pyjamas, blankets, mittens and other basics.

Finland spearheaded these baby-boxes, but Péloquin said the idea was in part inspired by the sudden death of an infant in Puvirnituq last summer, who is believed to have died of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. In a region where overcrowded housing is common, it’s important for newborns to have a safe space to sleep, she said.

Once the baby arrives, families receive regular home visits, which include basic education on how to soothe a crying baby, SIDS and discipline. As children move into the daycare system, the centre’s early stimulation program workers visit to identify children with any special needs.

In the South, SIPPE is already delivered by health centres across the province but the services are generally targeted at the most vulnerable populations.

But in the North, the program’s coordinators decided that all Nunavimmiut families could be considered vulnerable, so the program is extended to everyone in the region.

Instead of health and social services delivered individually, Nunavik’s two major health centres, Tulattavik and Inuulitsivik, are working on developing a more integrated approach, explained Luce Lepage, the head of youth and family program at Tulattavik.

“For all these young families with children from age 0-5, we consider: how can we prioritize the services they need?” Lepage said. “It’s really a community approach.”

The project has been established in Kuujjuaq, in part in Kangiqsualujjuaq and will be implemented in a third community in the fall of 2015.

The project’s longer-term goal is to allow each Nunavik community to adapt and develop the program according to its own needs, Lepage said.

“That’s why is so important to support the Inuit family educators and give them the support they need to stay on,” she said.

These three baby dolls at Kuujjuaq's Tulattavik health centre each represent a different health scenario: the baby on the left shows features of an infant exposed prenatally to drugs, the baby on the right shows features of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD), while the baby in the middle is considered healthy. A family coordinator based at the health centre uses those dolls to do FASD awareness and prenatal education for young families in the Nunavik community

These three baby dolls at Kuujjuaq’s Tulattavik health centre each represent a different health scenario: the baby on the left shows features of an infant exposed prenatally to drugs, the baby on the right shows features of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD), while the baby in the middle is considered healthy. A family coordinator based at the health centre uses those dolls to do FASD awareness and prenatal education for young families in the Nunavik community

As an Inuk mom of a two-year-old boy, Ningiuruvik-Turner understands how important family support is to young families.

And she understands the challenges parents face raising their children in a region that struggles with a housing shortage, domestic violence and addiction.

“When I go into the high school to talk to teenagers about [family planning and wellness], they always have a lot of questions for me,” Ningiuruvik-Turner said.

Those questions remind her that her outreach work is effective.

“I really hope those teenagers realize they can be a part of this too,” she said. “It would be awesome to have more Inuit working on this.”

FASD: Don’t be misinformed – 1st Video Series

There are a lot of misconceptions about fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. Watch this spot to get the truth.  A series of PSAs about FASD have recently been running on TV in Alaska.

FASD prevention campaign, ‘Thank you Mom’.

This video was developed by youth for the Saskatchewan Prevention Institute’s Youth Action for Prevention Project. This group of young people wrote, filmed, acted, and created the music for this video.

Reminder: FASD Messaging Ideas

A-good-idea

Calling all individuals, caregivers and parents, agencies and staff!

The EFAN Messaging Committee needs your brilliant ideas.  It is yet another time to share and shine!  Let your creative side out, think outside the box! We are looking ideas of how to create public awareness and to get the public involved in the prevention conversation.   Here is where to send your brilliant and awesome ideas edmontonefan@gmail.com

Prevention Matters 2015 Conference

Prevention Matters 2015 will be held September 30 – October 2, 2015 in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. The conference is hosted by the Saskatchewan Prevention Institute and the University of Saskatchewan.

The conference theme is “Prevention Matters for Children, Families, and Communities” and will provide opportunities to explore primary prevention efforts and highlight environmental and societal factors that positively influence the health and health behaviours of children and families.

'Prevention-Matters-Conference-Program2015

Several of the presentations address FASD prevention and supporting healthy pregnancies, including:
  • Preventing FASD in an Alocogenic Culture: Relationship, Contraception, and Alcohol Practices of 20somethings (Brooke Ramsay, Stewardship and Engagement Coordinator, Foothills Fetal Alcohol Society)
  • Aboriginal Maternal Mental Health and Resilience (Angela Bowen, Associate Professor, College of Nursing, University of Saskatchewan)
  • Pregnets: Pregnancy and Smoking (Jessica Penner, Knowledge Translation Coordinator, Nicotine Dependence Service, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto)
  • Baby’s Best Start Prenatal Program (Veronica Hawley, Public Health Nurse, Five Hills Health Region; Erin Hewitt, Public Health Nurse, Five Hills Health Region)
  • Working Holistically with Pregnant Women and Families in our Community (Donna Strauss, Executive Director; Jolene Furi, Prenatal Outreach Worker, Community Action Program for Children; Gabrielle Ermine, Prenatal Outreach Worker, FASD Strategy; Crystal Clarke, Prenatal Outreach Worker, FASD Strategy; Allison Gamble, Prenatal Outreach Worker, Canada Prenatal Nutrition Program; Rose Alcock, Prenatal Outreach Worker, Parenting Mentoring Program of Saskatchewan – Family Futures, Inc.)

Click here to visit the conference website 

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