FASD Research Study

Are you 18+ and pregnant?  Are you struggling and need support with alcohol and substance abuse? You may want to join the below study.

 

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Click below links for more information regarding this research study

Process for Addictions Services Staff June 8 2016supporting_maternal_health_through_research (1)

Mom Admits She Drank Alcohol While Pregnant

Not many women will admit to drinking alcohol while pregnant for fear of being judged, stigmatized, shamed, and blamed.  Tiffany Morgan wants you to know she drank alcohol while pregnant, she did not drink while knowing the effects of alcohol to her unborn child. Tiffany drank because she was told, drinking a glass or two of wine will boost her iron.  She was also told that her baby is protected because it’s in that sack of fluid.  Tiffany is sharing her story so to raise awareness about the risk of drinking while pregnant.

Article retrieved from http://www.twincities.com/2016/07/22/tiffany-morgan-drank-while-she-was-pregnant/

Tiffany Morgan gets a big hug from Ny-Ana, her 8-year-old daughter,  after she got off a bus after summer school in St. Paul on Wednesday, June 29, 2016 where her mom met her to walk her around the corner to their home.  Ny-Ana has Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Disorder and Tiffany is working with the Minnesota Organization on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome to educate mothers about the dangers of drinking while pregnant.  (Pioneer Press: Jean Pieri)Tiffany Morgan gets a big hug from Ny-Ana, her 8-year-old daughter, after she got off a bus after summer school in St. Paul on Wednesday, June 29, 2016 where her mom met her to walk her around the corner to their home. Ny-Ana has Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Disorder and Tiffany is working with the Minnesota Organization on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome to educate mothers about the dangers of drinking while pregnant. (Pioneer Press: Jean Pieri)

Sometimes bystanders are curious when they see Tiffany Morgan’s 8-year-old daughter have a meltdown at the playground. The conversation goes like this:

“Why is she doing that?” asks the stranger.

“She has FASD,” Morgan explains.

“What’s that?”

“It’s fetal alcohol syndrome.”

“What is that?”

“I drank while I was pregnant with her.”

Morgan has become accustomed to sharing her most private pain — if it helps someone understand her daughter Ny’Ana’s disability or raises awareness about the risks of drinking while pregnant. The 41-year-old St. Paul woman has become a spokeswoman for fetal alcohol spectrum disorders, the term given to the cognitive and physical damage that can result when a woman exposes her fetus to alcohol. The effects, which range from mild to severe, are a major cause of developmental disabilities and increasingly seen as a large public health problem, yet one the American Academy of Pediatrics calls “vastly under recognized.”

It’s also 100 percent preventable, but it’s not something most people feel comfortable talking about, said Ruth Richardson, program director at the Minnesota Organization on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (MOFAS). And that’s making it hard to deal with the problem.

“Until we shed the shame and the stigma about this issue, there are going to be secrets,” Richardson said. “And that’s going to make it hard to understand its scope.”

Obstetricians are not always sure how to talk to women about drinking, and pediatricians might never ask about it, she said. Schools might be unaware of children who have disabilities caused by alcohol.

And few people understand the complex reasons women drink while they are pregnant. They might drink before they know they have conceived. They might have addictions or be ignorant of how alcohol could affect a fetus.

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Tiffany Morgan listens to her daughter Ny-Ana talk about her school day in St. Paul on Wednesday, June 29, 2016. Ny-Ana has Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Disorder and Tiffany is working with the Minnesota Organization on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome to educate mothers about the dangers of drinking while pregnant. (Pioneer Press: Jean Pieri)

“No one sets out to hurt their baby,” Richardson said.

MOFAS, which was formed in 1998 to support foster and adoptive parents of children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders, recently started helping mothers like Morgan share their stories to raise public awareness.

“Tiffany really connects with the women,” said Catie Triviski, who coordinates the organization’s chemical health programs. “It’s so hard to process that you could have caused harm to your child. There’s so much shame that it can prevent women from even talking about it. And I know there are other women who contact her for support. She helps them know they aren’t alone.”

‘I DON’T REMEMBER THEM ASKING, DO YOU DRINK?’

Morgan grew up in Evansville, Ind., the second of five children in a tight-knit black community where, as she put it, “if you got past your parents, you didn’t get past your neighbors.” Her mother is a retired school teacher. Her father, who passed away in 2009, was a mechanic. He also drank heavily. Morgan didn’t know about that until she was 16 and was called to a hospital emergency room after her dad almost died of complications from alcohol withdrawal.

She kept to herself as a child, reading Nancy Drew mysteries and “Little House on the Prairie.” After high school, she tried to enroll in the Army and was told she was pregnant during the routine health exam. She said prenatal visits with her doctor didn’t touch on avoiding alcohol.

“I don’t remember them asking, do you drink, or when do you drink, or how much do you drink?” she said. “I just remember hearing ‘your baby is protected because it’s in that sack of fluid.’ ”

Morgan said her doctor told her to drink a couple of glasses of red wine to boost her iron. She wasn’t a drinker then. So, instead, her grandmother cooked up iron-rich collard greens.

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Meet Tisha – #44 of 90 Real People. Real Lives. #FASD

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Lighter Side of FASD

Mac got really excited when Tisha decided to run with us! She is from South Africa – so on his way around the globe he stopped by to pick her up.

MEET TISHA – Tisha is 20. She came into our family at 10 weeks old as she was abandoned at birth. She was a premature baby with a lot of challenges and wasn’t expected to live more than a few days after she came to her family.

MY STORY – I am 20 and had to attend special needs school. I have a full-time job that I love and have friends. I like watching YouTube. I cannot read or write or do numbers. I have difficulty remembering.

STRENGTHS – I like people and I am friendly.  I have a full time job. I try my best. I talk about FASD to warn women about drinking alcohol when pregnant.

STRUGGLES…

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Why do Pregnant Women Drink Alcohol – 40th Video Series

A woman’s decision to consume alcohol during pregnancy is highly stigmatized. This video takes a rare and respectful look at the individual circumstances that surround the choice to drink.

August 2016 – EFAN Monthly Meeting Agenda Items

August monthly meeting will be held at CSS office – 10320 146 St NW

Please park on the street, parking spots at the office building are all assigned.

2016 August Meeting

Picture Source: textimages.us

 

EFAN Monthly Meeting Notice

Date: August 02, 2016

Time: 8:30 am Supports/Services And 9:30 Society Meeting

Location:  10320 146 St NW

Click here to download agenda items

10 Ways a Speech-Language Pathologist Can Help Your Child

Retrieved from http://www.friendshipcircle.org

Communication

Speech-Language Pathologist. Speech Pathologist. Speech Teacher. Known by many names, people refer to these specialists most often as speech therapists. They work with children with a variety of delays and disorders spanning from mild articulation delays to more complex disorders such as autism, Down syndrome, hearing impairment, motor speech disorders, and other developmental delays.

SLP’s, as they are called for short, are the specialists that help your child with speech, talking and communication. However you may be surprised at how broad this field of speech-language pathology really is and  just how many skill areas SLPs are trained to build and expand in young children.

An SLP can help your child with…

1. Articulation Skills/Speech Intelligibility

Articulation is the physical ability to move the tongue, lips, jaw and palate (known as the articulators) to produce individual speech sounds which we call phonemes. For example, to articulate the /b/ sound, we need to inhale, then while exhaling we need to turn our voice on, bring our slightly tensed lips together to stop and build up the airflow, and then release the airflow by parting our lips.

Intelligibility, refers to how well people can understand your child’s speech. If a child’s articulation skills are compromised for any reason, his intelligibility will be decreased in compared to other children his age. SLP’s can work with your child to teach them how to produce the specific speech sounds or sound patterns that he is having difficulty with, and thus increasing his overall speech intelligibility.You can read more about articulation development and delays here.

2. Expressive Language Skills

While speech involves the physical motor ability to talk, language is a symbolicrule governed system used to convey a message. In English, the symbols can be words, either spoken or written. We also have gestural symbols like shrugging our shoulders to indicate “I don’t know” or waving to indicate “Bye Bye” or the raising of our eye brows to indicate that we are surprised by something.

Expressive language then, refers to what your child says. Speech-language pathologists can help your child learn new words and how to put them together to form phrases and sentences (semantics and syntax) so that your child can communicate to you and others. You can read more about the difference between speech and language here.

Click here for the rest of the article

Disclaimer:  The views and opinions in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of Edmonton and Area Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder Network.

Moms-at-risk get needed support in inner city Edmonton

The Prevention Conversation: A Shared Responsibility Project

Moms-at-risk get needed support in inner city Edmonton

"Jenny," who's name has been changed to protect the identity of her two children in government care, was supported by the Healthy, Empowered, and Resilient Pregnancy Program during her third pregnancy. She is now successfully caring for 2-month old Britney. Edmonton, Monday, July 18, 2016. Ed Kaiser/Postmedia

The birth of her baby girl should have been the happiest day of the young mom’s life; instead, it became an agonizing experience.

The baby was just 10 hours old when Child and Family Services apprehended her, as they had her son a few months before.

“It was so painful to have that happen,” said ‘Jenny,’ whose name has been changed to protect the identity of her children who remain in care.

“I just get really pissed off that that happened, because I could have prevented it. I don’t know why I was so … stupid back then,” she said, turning away tearfully.

Three years later, the ache of that moment is dulled by the joy of caring for her newborn daughter Britney.

As she sat in the pregnancy support office at Edmonton’s Boyle Street Community Services…

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